What Is Felony Theft In Ohio?

felony theft in Ohio is defined by Ohio law
What is felony theft in Ohio?  Theft in Ohio is defined in Ohio Revised Code 2913.02 (R.C. 2913.02).  If the value of the items total one thousand dollars or more but less than seven thousand five hundred dollars, then the offense is theft, a felony of the fifth degree.  This offense has a maximum prison term of twelve months.  If the value of the items total seven thousand five hundred dollars or more and less than one hundred fifty thousand dollars, the offense is grand theft, a felony of the fourth degree.  This offense has a maximum prison term of eighteen months.  If the value of the items total one hundred fifty thousand dollars or more and is less than seven hundred fifty thousand dollars, the offense is aggravated theft, a felony of the third degree.  If the value of the property is seven hundred fifty thousand dollars or more and is less than one million five hundred thousand dollars, the offense is aggravated theft, a felony of the second degree.  If the value of the property is one million five hundred thousand dollars or more, the offense is aggravated theft of one million five hundred thousand or more, a felony of the first degree. Theft of certain items are automatically felony offenses, regardless of the value of the property.  These specific offenses of felony theft in Ohio are set forth in Ohio Revised Code 2913.02 (R.C. 2913.02) and Ohio Revised Code 2913.71 (R.C. 2913.71).  Fifth degree felonies include: theft of a credit card; theft of a license plate; and theft of a blank motor vehicle certificate of title.  Fourth degree felonies include: motor vehicle theft and theft of a dangerous drug.  Third degree felonies include: theft of a police dog, theft of a firearm and theft of anhydrous ammonia.  This last item has been a hot topic in Medina County over the past five years, as farmers commonly use or store increasingly larger amounts of anhydrous ammonia for use as a fertilizer.  Anhydrous ammonia is also an ingredient in methamphetamines, which makes it a theft target.  Finally, theft of a firearm from a federally licensed firearms dealer is a felony of the first degree.

Daniel Gigiano Reviews And Articles

  To learn more, read my posts related to felony theft in Ohio, where I wrote about will that Ohio judge go along with my agreed sentence, not all fifth degree felonies are alike in Ohio, how to keep from going to jail, make sure you do not serve the same time twice in Ohio jail, Ohio DUI laws have new changes, the price of Ohio shoplifting, and sealing Ohio convictions. I have successfully defended individuals for both misdemeanor and felony offenses, including felony theft, as set forth in the case highlights section. This success is reflected in the following links to my reviews: Daniel Gigiano reviews; Daniel Gigiano ratings; and Daniel Gigiano work.

Daniel Gigiano Works Hard To Get Results For His Clients

  Attorney Gigiano’s office is located at 102 Main St., Ste. 200,  just a short distance from Medina, Ohio.  If you have questions about felony theft in Ohio or other questions you need answered by an experienced Wadsworth criminal defense attorney in Medina County, please call Attorney Daniel F. Gigiano at 330-336-3330.  Attorney Gigiano has tried over thirty-five jury trials to a verdict, many of them in Medina County, Summit County and Wayne County.