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Posts tagged "felony theft in Ohio"

What Is Extradition?

What is extradition? Extradition is a procedure where a person in one state is surrendered to another state in connection with separate criminal proceedings. Usually, that person has fled the state to avoid prosecution, sentencing or incarceration. A person who flees prosecution or sentencing is called a fugitive.   One the fugitive is arrested, he or she can either request a hearing to contest the extradition or can waive the right to this hearing. If the fugitive waives the right to a hearing, he or she will be available for return to the state that issued the warrant. (more…)

Ohio Outlaws Debtors’ Prison

The Ohio Supreme Court has ordered Ohio courts to stop reviving debtors’ prison.  In other words, Ohio outlaws debtors’ prison.  In February 2014, the high court indicated that it would not tolerate the court’s imprisoning people who could not afford to pay fines and costs.   What is debtors’ prison?   (more…)

Can a Juvenile Court Give an Adult Sentence?

Can a juvenile court give an adult sentence?  It sure can.  However, this option is only available for a Serious Youthful Offender (SYO), which blends juvenile and adult sentences.  Bindovers to adult court are not included in this article, as those cases involve a hearing to determine if a juvenile should be tried as an adult, and, if so, the juvenile’s case is transferred to adult court.  SYO exists in the world between the typical juvenile proceedings and adult court. (more…)

What Is Felony Theft In Ohio?

What is felony theft in Ohio?  Theft in Ohio is defined in Ohio Revised Code 2913.02 (R.C. 2913.02).  If the value of the items total one thousand dollars or more but less than seven thousand five hundred dollars, then the offense is theft, a felony of the fifth degree.  This offense has a maximum prison term of twelve months.  If the value of the items total seven thousand five hundred dollars or more and less than one hundred fifty thousand dollars, the offense is grand theft, a felony of the fourth degree.  This offense has a maximum prison term of eighteen months.  If the value of the items total one hundred fifty thousand dollars or more and is less than seven hundred fifty thousand dollars, the offense is aggravated theft, a felony of the third degree.  If the value of the property is seven hundred fifty thousand dollars or more and is less than one million five hundred thousand dollars, the offense is aggravated theft, a felony of the second degree.  If the value of the property is one million five hundred thousand dollars or more, the offense is aggravated theft of one million five hundred thousand or more, a felony of the first degree. (more…)

Can Police Pull You Over Based On A Tip From Another Driver?

There are times when the police conduct a traffic stop on a vehicle based upon a tip from a citizen that the vehicle was driving erratically.  Sometimes, this is a tip from another driver.  When the police observe traffic violations that, by themselves, justify a traffic stop, courts need not analyze the reliability of the citizen’s tip in determining whether the traffic stop was valid.  However, the police often gather little to no evidence prior to conducting a traffic stop.  In those instances, courts must analyze the reliability of the tip.  In other words, the courts ask: "can police pull you over based on a tip from another driver?" In analyzing the reliability of the tip, informants are divided into three classes: (1)        the anonymous informant; (2)        the known informant; and (3)        the identified citizen informant. (more…)