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Posts tagged "Ohio felony theft"

Intervention In Lieu Of Conviction

Intervention in Lieu of conviction is a program that allows one charged with a crime to obtain a dismissal at the conclusion of the program. In order to be eligible, drug addiction, alcohol addiction, or mental health issues must have played a part in the commission of the offense. The program focuses on treating, rather than punishing, the problem.   Once the charges are dismissed, the record is not sealed off from the public. The arrest record likely still exists. In order to wipe the docket and arrest from the record, one must file to have those records sealed and expunged. When can this record be expunged? Does one have to wait one year for a misdemeanor or three years for a felony? The Ohio Supreme Court addressed this question in State v. Niesen-Pennycuff. In this case, the Ohio Supreme Court held that, because the charges are dismissed at the conclusion of an intervention in lieu of conviction program, there is no conviction. The waiting periods only apply to convictions. Therefore, expungement of the docket and arrest is available immediately. However, the Ohio Supreme Court decided that, just because trial courts can immediately grant a request for expungement, it does not mean that they must. The trial courts could impose their own waiting period, even if the waiting period is as long as those for eligibility for expungement of convictions. A skilled criminal defense attorney, such as this Akron criminal law attorney near Barberton, can help one navigate the different situations and courts. (more…)

Can You Lie To The Police?

Can you lie to the police? No. You have the right to remain silent, not to lie, especially if that lie is designed to mislead the police. Then, the lie is considered obstruction of justice or obstruction of official business.   Obstructing justice is defined in Ohio Revised Code 2921.32 (R.C. 2921.32). It is a crime to attempt to hinder the discovery, apprehension, conviction or punishment of a person who has committed a crime. This can include lying or misleading the police, harboring or hiding the accused person, or helping the accused person evade the police. It can also include the use of bribery or intimidation. If the crime committed by the person aided is a misdemeanor, obstructing justice is a misdemeanor of the same degree. For example, if the aided person committed assault, a first degree misdemeanor, obstructing justice would be a first degree misdemeanor. If the crime committed by the person aided is a third, fourth or fifth degree felony, other potential penalties are specified under R.C. 2921.32.   Obstructing official business is defined in Ohio Revised Code 2921.31 (R.C. 2921.31), making it illegal to prevent, obstruct or delay a police officer or other public official in the performance of his or her official duties. (more…)

Ohio Has A Unique Restriction On Traffic Stops

Ohio has a unique restriction on traffic stops.  The Ohio Supreme Court, in its Robinette decision, said that police officers may not request consent for a search of a vehicle, once the purpose of the initial traffic stop is completed and there is no evidence of any wrongdoing beyond the reason for the traffic stop.  The Supreme Court of Ohio said that the courts have an obligation to protect the ordinary law-abiding citizen from intrusive, illegal and overbearing government action.  This protection is necessary because most people are not aware of their right to refuse consent to a search of their vehicle. The United States Supreme Court, in its review of this decision, declined to adopt this rule for the entire nation.  In doing so, the rule was left intact in Ohio.  This was an unfortunate decision, as the Ohio Supreme Court got it right in this instance.  Authorities should not be allowed to further detain people and request consent after they have already issued a citation, and checked for license, registration and insurance.  This person should be free to drive off without being subjected to a fishing expedition. (more…)

What Is Shoplifting In Ohio?

Have you been picked up for shoplifting in Ohio?

While people commonly refer to stealing from a store as shoplifting, there is not an offense in Ohio that is called shoplifting.  So, what is shoplifting in Ohio?  Shoplifting in Ohio is technically known as theft, which is defined in Ohio Revised Code 2913.02 (R.C. 2913.02).  Theft can be either a misdemeanor or a felony.  If the value of the items total less than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00), the offense is petty theft, a misdemeanor of the first degree.  This offense has a maximum jail term of one hundred eighty days in jail.  If the value of the items total one thousand dollars or more but less than seven thousand five hundred dollars, then the offense is theft, a felony of the fifth degree.  This offense has a maximum prison term of twelve months.  If the value of the items total seven thousand five hundred dollars or more and less than one hundred fifty thousand dollars, the offense is grand theft, a felony of the fourth degree.  This offense has a maximum prison term of eighteen months. (more…)