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Posts tagged "Ohio jail time credit"

What Is Shoplifting In Ohio?

Have you been picked up for shoplifting in Ohio?

While people commonly refer to stealing from a store as shoplifting, there is not an offense in Ohio that is called shoplifting.  So, what is shoplifting in Ohio?  Shoplifting in Ohio is technically known as theft, which is defined in Ohio Revised Code 2913.02 (R.C. 2913.02).  Theft can be either a misdemeanor or a felony.  If the value of the items total less than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00), the offense is petty theft, a misdemeanor of the first degree.  This offense has a maximum jail term of one hundred eighty days in jail.  If the value of the items total one thousand dollars or more but less than seven thousand five hundred dollars, then the offense is theft, a felony of the fifth degree.  This offense has a maximum prison term of twelve months.  If the value of the items total seven thousand five hundred dollars or more and less than one hundred fifty thousand dollars, the offense is grand theft, a felony of the fourth degree.  This offense has a maximum prison term of eighteen months. (more…)

More Potential Jurors Want Convictions

I have been noticing a disturbing trend over the past two years.  More potential jurors want convictions.   Some want so badly to return a verdict of guilty that they are willing to ignore the law in order to find the person guilty.  How have I discovered this fact?  During my twenty years of practice, I have developed a number of questions that I ask potential jurors in order to determine if they could be fair and impartial to my client.  One of these questions simply asks the potential juror if he or she would make the State of Ohio prove each and every element of the offense beyond a reasonable doubt before making a finding of guilty.  I go one step further and ask what the juror would do if the State proves all but one element beyond a reasonable doubt, with that one missing element being close but not quite there.  In my first eighteen years of practice, every potential juror answered this question correctly, which was to return a verdict of not guilty.  The first six of those years were spent as an assistant prosecutor, watching other defense attorneys ask various versions of this same question.  The other twelve of those years, I asked that question as the criminal defense attorney. (more…)

Unreliable Identification Cannot Be Used At Trial

If the identification procedure used by the police is suggestive and unnecessary, it is a violation of the accused person’s rights. The courts look at the corrupting effect of the suggestive identification against the witness’s ability to make an accurate identification.  Even if the witness had an adequate opportunity to view a suspect, the later use of a highly suggestive identification procedure can make the witness’ testimony inadmissible.  In other words, unreliable identification cannot be used at trial. Courts consider a number of factors, including: (1)        opportunity of the witness to view the criminal a the time of the crime; (2)        the witness’ degree of attention; (3)        the accuracy of the witness’ prior description of the criminal; (4)        the level of certainty demonstrated by the witness at the confrontation; and (5)        the length of time between the crime and the confrontation. (more…)