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Posts tagged "Ohio child custody factors"

Divorce And Dissolution

How do divorce and dissolution differ from one another? A dissolution is an agreement to terminate the marriage, with an agreement on how to divide their assets and debts, as well as agreement on child custody, child support, parenting time and spousal support. In order to have a dissolution, the parties must agree on all of the issues. Paperwork is filed and the matter is resolved in a single hearing. The dissolution process is usually completed within two to three months after filing.   When the parties cannot agree on all of the issues, but wish to terminate the marriage, they must do so with a divorce. One of the eleven grounds for divorce must be alleged. Incompatibility cannot be proven, but must be agreed upon by both parties in order to be used as a ground for divorce. Divorce usually consists of temporary orders hearings, case management hearings, pre-trial hearings, and final hearings (trials). The final hearing does not usually occur until at least nine months after filing and sometimes well over one year after filing.   (more…)

Minimum Amount Of Child Support

Is there a minimum amount of child support that a court must order?  Yes, there is.  Courts usually order guideline support, which is the amount of support calculated under the child support guidelines.  However, Ohio Revised Code 3119.06 (R.C. 3119.06) requires the court to order a minimum child support order of $50 per month.  If the person is not working and receiving needs-based assistance, then, while the arrearages accrue, the obligation to pay child support is suspended as long as the person is complying with a seek-work order.   Even though the statute says that is the lowest amount, is it?  No.  Ohio law also allows the court to order one to pay less than $50 per month or not require any child support if the parent ordered to pay has a medically verified or documented physical or mental disability or institutionalization for mental illness.   (more…)

What Is Separate Property In Divorce?

Daniel F. GIgiano, Attorney at Law, Wadsworth, OhioWhat is separate property in divorce?  It is property that the spouse gets to keep without it being subject to an equitable division by the divorce court.
First, we should look at what is marital property under Ohio law.  The Ohio law defining marital property is found in Ohio Revised Code 3105.171 (R.C. 3105.171).  Marital property is:
  1. All property currently owned by either or both parties or acquired by either or both of the parties during the marriage; and
  2. All property interest that either or both parties currently holds acquired by either or both of the spouses during the marriage;
  3. Active income, which is all income and appreciation on separate property, due to the labor, monetary, or in-kind contribution of either or both of the spouses that occurred during the marriage;
  4. Anything that is not separate property.
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